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Musing Izumi

This has been a year of change. February, my status at work changed to full-time. It's been ten years since I've been full-time at a job. March, my inlaws, who had been living with us for 3-1/2 years, moved to their own place. May, FrenkelFail happened. July, my gall bladder was removed because they found a gallstone.

It is now October, and I can almost say the dust as settled. I know there are a couple of other things that are coming down the pike, but I'll wait until they appear before I mention it. Right now, I want to write about how my writing life adjusted (and trust me, it was a huge adjustment.)

I did a guest blog over at Sarah Hans's website (and yeah, it's been so busy, I'm just now getting around to mentioning it). In it, I mentioned that I started getting up at 5:30am to write. Yeah, that didn't last long. Turns out, I'm really not a morning person. I was only able to do it for two weeks before deciding I really, really like getting my sleep in the mornings. And when I did try to write, I would write well for about 15 minutes or so, run out of steam, then sit there staring blankly for the rest of the hour or so, writing whenever something came to mind.

Come to think of it, that was how I wrote. Period.

A couple of years ago, I was chatting with Sarah Monette about her writing process. Her method was to leave a story project open on her computer and work on it in bits and pieces throughout the day. At the time, I thought it was a slow process. After all, there are many creatives who say to schedule at least an hour to work on a project. Writing in shorter increments won't work because it takes you 15 minutes to warm up and get into your stride and then by the time you are all warmed up, stopping kills the flow.

But...as I thought about it...that's how I was if I was working with a time crunch deadline. When I don't have that, or if I'm brainstorming, or revising?  It doesn't take an hour and a half. Before, I would sit at my desk for an hour, slowly going through the text line by line. If I wrote in shorter time chunks, how would that work? How could I arrange things so I could write in shorter bursts? What I needed was more than just adjusting to writing in a shorter time period. I needed to change my entire writing process.

In a sense, it's like going back to basics with Barbara DeMarco's book: "Pen on Fire: A Busy Woman's Guide to Igniting the Writer Within". In it, she suggested to set aside 15 minutes to work on writing. I can find at least 15 minutes during the day. Can I write during my morning break at work? In 15 minutes, I sure can. What about lunch? 15 minutes there? Afternoon break? 15 minutes At home? another 15 minutes. Hey, that's an hour right there.

Now that I'm writing now at odd times, I needed something that I could have accessible at any moment, at any time, where I could jot down thoughts and lines and words as they came to me throughout the day. Something so accessible, I could use it even when I didn't have access to internet. Get ready, because this will blow your mind.
 
 
 
Ordinary pen and paper. Who'd thunk, RIGHT?
 
Having a physical notebook means that I can write anywhere, anytime. Which, if I'm brainstorming or jotting notes or playing with sentences, it's awesome. I can be thinking about my work, honing it in my head, then jot a few phrases down. Get enough of those, and I got me a working draft.
 
Revisions are a little trickier. It's easier for me to edit drafts on the computer, therefore I needed a way to do it so I can access those drafts anytime, anywhere. This meant changing the place where I stored my work from my local computer to the cloud. Currently I'm using Dropbox, and it's nice. I still back up to local though, because backups are good.
 
This also meant I could no longer bounce between three programs: Writer's Cafe, Word and Scrivener. I had to stick with something that could contain all my work and notes and word processing in one place, that I could access from anywhere. 
 
I loved Writer's Cafe. I really, really did. I even wrote a blog post comparing the two programs, saying I couldn't give up Writer's Cafe even though Scrivener was the better choice. Well, that changed this summer. Scrivener was overwhelmingly better in keeping all my notes, drafts, storyboards, annotations and working drafts in one spot. And as I used Scrivener, I began to discover new ways to keep my writing on track: utilizing the outliner, working with meta-data. You know the best feature I'm loving right now? Color-coding the annotations in my drafts to show what needed to be done in the texts. A sort of to-do list, if you will. Parts I need to brainstorm are in blue, sentence rewrites in white, facts to research in orange--even if I'm not actively writing, I can open Scrivener, choose a color, and work on those in bits and pieces throughout the day. Then, when I'm done, I delete the note. It's nice to see all those notes and comments vanish as the story firms up.
 
Sorry, Writer's Cafe, but from now on, I'll have to go with Scrivener.
 
So that was my summer--figuring out Scrivener and the new writing process. Write in bits and pieces, get them into Scrivener. Expand. Set myself a limit of 500 words. (Oh, yes! Scrivener is awesome for setting daily writing goals). Work on the text in bits and pieces. And, if needed, use a couple of vacation days as writing retreat days, go to a coffee house and write like mad all day.
 
All of this to say, October 1, I finished the first draft of a new 6000 word story. I didn't think I would have time to do that, and I'm quite pleased with it. I've also been working on Willow (because oh gosh, that never ends), and now that I have everything in Scrivener, I find working on it much MUCH easier. 
 
I may have lost time with the expansion of the day job, but nowadays, I've been feeling way more productive than the past three 1/2 years. We'll see how things go.
 

A Brief Note of Thanks

Musing Izumi
 There’s been a lot happening with Wiscon the past few weeks. I won’t go into it–there are other places you can read up on it– but this week the Wiscon Concom released this statement that Jim Frenkel is permanently banned from Wiscon.

I’m not going to go into the ban itself other than to say it was sorely needed–again, others did a better job of it of explaining why. Also I’m local, so I feel I’m too close to things to share my opinions in public. I’m also a relative newcomer to the con scene, so I don’t think anything I say about Wiscon will have much impact. But there is one thing I do want to say:

In the past few weeks I saw a lot of expressed anger and hurt feelings. I saw turmoil and disappointment. I saw several people step down from the concomm. I also saw a lot of people who said they were angry, but they weren’t going to give up on Wiscon. They were going to work to make things right.

These are the people I want to give their due. Because they worked hard, and they’re still working hard as I write this. And it’s not just local people. It’s people all over the country, people who could’ve just as easily boycotted Wiscon…

(…although this was probably the first time I saw the use of boycotting actually affect change. I’m so used to hearing people decry, “I’ll boycott X or I’ll boycott Y” and for the most part, everyone is like ‘meh’. Many of the people I spoke to who announced they were boycotting Wiscon wasn’t doing it out of spite. They were genuinely concerned for the con and the safety of its attendees. And that helped spur the change within Wiscon itself.)

An institution is only as good as the people that make it up. The Wiscon concom is not perfect, as so many of you pointed out. But they are working on it. And because Wiscon is my home con this is one of the few cons I can go to, the fact that there are people here who are willing to humble themselves, say they’re sorry, then work on change, makes me appreciate them. Deeply.

So thank you, Wiscon, for doing the right thing.

 

Musing Izumi

So I've been following with great interest the discussion about dialect in fiction. It started off by Daniel Jose Older's comments of a review of his anthology Long Hidden in Strange Horizons, and followed by Abyss & Apex doing an editorial post on the decision to post two different version of a story with a Carribean dialect. There have been many thoughtful essays on it, including Tobias Buckell, Amal El-Mohtar, and Ferrett Steinmetz, so I don't think I have anything to add except to tell my experience. Which isn't much, but it's my two cents, so take that as you will.

Personally, I've struggled with dialect in my fiction. Growing up, I was the kid who was teased for "talking proper". I understood Shakespeare better than the slang kids used around my neighborhood. So when I write fiction with black kids, I always worry that they don't "sound black enough". But now that I'm thinking about it, I was at least aware of it--we tended to drop our 'g's a lot, mainly in -ing suffixes. "I'm goin to the store."  Using the d sound for th--what's dat? Is it over dere? You know what I miss? 'Fin'. As in "She finna go to the store." "Did you wash the sheets like I axed?" "Man, I FIN to!" 

Interesting aside #1--my mother always mocked us when we said "ovuh dare" for "over there". She said it made us sound like country hicks. That was the only thing she corrected our speech on. Either that or I've blocked out what else she corrected us on.

Interesting aside #2--in college, I dated a white guy who one showed me how to use the 'th' sound. Up to that point, I didn't think there was a difference until he showed me how to place my tongue at the back of my teeth. And by that, he showed me using his tongue. Looking back at it now, I have super mixed feelings about it: on the one hand, there's the dynamic of a white guy teaching a black girl how to speak 'properly' (I'm sure he didn't think about that at all--only thought he was doing a good thing). On the flip side, damn if that wasn't the sexiest linguist lesson I ever had....

So I just wrote those two asides, and I thought huh. Actually, those two asides play a lot into how I write. I'm coming from a background where "proper English" was correct, not just grammar, but also pronunciation. My mother didn't want me and my sisters to sound like uneducated hicks because she wanted us to have clear diction, which in her opinion would get us better jobs than working at McDonalds.. My boyfriend wanted me to speak the way he did. And in the African American community, we don't have the option where the way we speak is consider a "second language" or a "foreign dialect". With us, "white english" equals proper and preferred, "black english" equals ghetto and uneducated. I could show proof, but ain't nobody got time fo dat.

Angry aside #3--I once dropped a white ex-co-worker from Facebook because of that. Seemed to be a nice guy, went to church, volunteered at our community center. When he learned that Obama had been re-elected, he wrote on his wall "Mo welfare fo us all!" I wanted to say, "How can you mentor those kids at the community center and then turn around and write such a thing?" but I was too upset to respond to him Instead, I dropped him like a hot potato.

It would be good to change black english from being a stigma to something more legitimate. One way we can do so is through stories, because it allows us to tell our own narratives. The problem is that there are those who will always see those dialects as low brow and ignorant. How can we move beyond that? I don't have an answer. It's something that is far larger and deeper than I can touch on. The notion that I've been bending  towards the white dominant culture is something I'm just now beginning to recognize in my life. I'm working on a separate blog post about it--it's pretty long and deep, and I'm still trying to decide if I'm going to post it here or somewhere not as public

But what I can do is strive to have more black dialect in my writing. And for me, that means becoming more aware, paying attention, listening. Advocating it more. And having more conversations about it. I liked what Apex Abyss did in putting both versions of Celeste Rita Baker's story "Name Calling" on their site. (Interestingly, I found the original patois version more engaging. I could hear her voice in my head, whereas the edited version was okay, but more muted.)

Isn't that the point of stories? To push us? Transport us? To take us out of our lives and put them into another's?

We also need to give writers a safe space to write stories in their own voices. I thought the point of Long Hidden was to give marginalized voices a chance to be heard. And those voices should include 'black english' because that is just as legitimate. It has its own rhythm, its own music, and to erase that is to erase voices that groaned in captivity, that sang in both joy and sorrow, that shouted for justice, and to this day continues to unsettle, unnerve, and push comfort zones to make itself heard.

Now, if you excuse me, I finna go work on my writin, cause dat’s wha’ its’' ‘bout, son.

My Wiscon 38 Schedule

Musing Izumi

It’s that time of year again! I plan to be at Wiscon 38 this year, with GoHs N. K. Jemisin and Hiromi Goto. And of course, I have a schedule!




Friday, May 23



Reading at Michelangelos

4:00–5:15pm


Come join me along with Greg Bechtel, David D. Levine and James P. Roberts as we read short stories. I’ll be reading “21 Steps to Enlightenment (Minus 1)”. Also, there will be chocolate!


POC Dinner, Room 629

5:30-7:00pm 

Are you a Person of Color? Going to Wiscon? Come to the POC dinner! Details can be found on the official FB invite. If you're not on Facebook, we also have a Google Doc where you can sign up and specify the type of meal you want.


Dream Apart: A storygame of the fantastic shtetl, Solitaire

8:00-11:00 pm

I'm participating in a storygame with Benjamin Rosenbaum. A GM-less, collaborative, rules-light, historical fantasy storygame of sorcerers and scholars, midwives and matchmakers, soldiers and klezmers, dybbuks, gossip, pogroms, trolls, rebels, betrothals, demons, angels, blood libel, lusts, and secrets in an Eastern European Jewish shtetl, circa 1850. There's still a slot open!




Saturday, May

24

Complexity in the World of Jem, Conference 4
4:00–5:15 pm

Join me, K. Tempest Bradford, Isabel Schechter and others as we talk ALL THINGS JEM! Let’s explore all this plus the show's gender roles (why are Rio and Eric so controlling), how not to run a business (Starlight Records is a mess), and Jem's curious distrust of the police and law enforcement (the Misfits never go to jail).




Sunday, May
25



No panels for me!




Monday, May 26



SignOut

11:30a to 12:45p

Stop by and say hi, and if you have the What Fates Impose  or the Dark Faith: Invocations anthologies, bring them by and I'll sign them!

Musing Izumi

I have a new story up! You can now read "Sun-Touched" for free over at Kaleidotrope.

You can thank Neil Gaiman for this one. In 2010, I was invited to attend “The Gathering of American Gods” at the House on the Rock. I was trying to think of a cool costume to wear and, well, okay, I was looking for an excuse to dye my wedding dress with tea. I came up with going as the Moth Queen, because I had a pin shaped like a butterfly, but this party would be at night, so moths fit better.

Well, the costume idea petered out, (I wound up going as a vaguely steampunk lady). But the idea of a Moth Queen stuck with me, and I began to play with the idea. How I went from a Queen to a Princess, Queen and Dowager, I don’t remember. but when I came up with the idea of butterfly people (papilion) being enemies of the moth people (doptera), and how the moth people are attracted to light, I knew I had a story.

I will confess, coming up with the backstory and history of the world was somewhat difficult. After I finished it, I shopped it around. One of the rejections I got mentioned that it was a very good story, but the editor wished the doptera and papilion were more insect-like. And this is true. But I had no clue how to make them more insect-like without making them relatable. And besides, I had a selfish wish to keep the figurines as is, which play a part in the story.

Hmm. Writing that though makes me wonder. Can I make a lead character that’s not human, completely alien, and yet make them relatable? At the time I wrote Sun-Touched, I didn’t think I could. Now? I might be able.

In the meantime, enjoy "Sun-Touched", and let me know what you think!

Musing Izumi

It’s now up! “21 Steps to Enlightenment (Minus 1)” is up now at Strange Horizons! It has an illustration! It has a podcast! It is so cool!

The inspiration for this story came one day when I was on Google Plus (why yes…I do go there from time to time). Someone had posted an album of different spiral staircase pictures, and when I clicked on the album, it posted all the staircases at once. Seeing all those staircases and spirals got me wondering: what if spiral staircases appeared at random, with no reason whatsoever. What would be at the top? And then I wondered…if spiral staircases could appear out of nowhere, who to say it’s just a normal staircase? What other materials could it be made out of? How fanciful could I make these staircases?

Oh, I had a fun time coming up with the different kinds of staircases. But I didn’t have much of a plot until I came up with the idea that the staircase was a metaphor for epiphanies and enlightenment. Around this time, I had visited my folks back in Chicago, and wound up watching the Help with the womenfolk of my family, including my grandmother, who is awesomely badass. Talking with her and my own mother about growing up and raising kids, made me want to commemorate their strength, while at the same time showing how opportunities seem to open up more for each generation. So I decided to make the spiral story more personal.

The Momma in the story is a mash-up of my mom and grandmother. There are other true parts too; if you know me, you’ll figure it out. I never snuck out of my house, for instance. But the boyfriend part? That’s mostly true. So was the feeling of optimism. My dad never wanted to join the circus though.

Anyway, check it out and let me know what you think. What would your spiral staircase look like?

Musing Izumi

I've been busy the past few weeks, and I'm about to get even busier. I'll do another post about that, but real quick, here's what I've been up to:

I did a guest post over at Bill Bodden's blog about keeping yourself going when you're in Revision Hell. Warning: I make a confession about Digimon.

I also knitted a Totoro hat, which I blogged about at Nerds of Color . I talked about cosplay, anime and connecting with other black geeks. It also got a mention over at GeekMom, so yay!

On February 3, I have a short story, "21 Steps to Enlightenment (Minus 1)" appearing on Strange Horizons, and it will be illustrated!

Finally, in February, I'm planning to participate in the 2014 Month of Letters Challenge. You may remember I attempted the challenge a couple of years ago, but barely got into it before quitting. Well, I'm going to try it again, and this time, I'm going to be tracking my progress over at HabitRPG . If you're interested in joining me, I have a challenge all set up at the Tavern. (Did I mention that you should check out HabitRPG anyway? They've really changed it the last time I posted about it, adding quests, checklists, pets, cool armor. Making a task list has never been so much fun!). nd if you're not on HabitRPG, check out the Month of Letters Challenge anyway. It's a fun way to get back into the habit of sending snail mail. And if you’re interested in getting a letter from me, leave a comment below and I’ll connect with you to get your address. I’d love to write to you!

LaShawn’s 2013 Year in Review

Musing Izumi

Looking back on 2013, it feels like I didn't have much to say.

That doesn't mean I wasn't busy. I've been chugging along on Willow and, for the first time, I've had alpha readers chime in on how things fit together. Sometimes it felt like one step forward, two steps back, and there have been other times when I wonder if it's all worth it, but the story is getting more and more streamlined. As of this writing, I'm 60% done.

I think this whole year, writing-wise, was learning how to write more productively and more quickly. I'm also learning the hard way to get the words on the page and not worry about making them perfect. Spending less time being stuck on things and more on using placeholders to get an idea of what I want, then coming back to it at another time.

Publishing-wise, I only had two items published in 2013, my flash story “Ebb and Flow” at Daily Science Fiction and my short story, "There Are No Wrong Answers" in the anthology What Fates Impose. The former I've been shopping around for a couple of years, the latter I wrote in a month and was immediately accepted. I had fun with both. 2014 will have more publishing news from me, the most notable being my short story, "21 Steps to Enlightenment (Minus 1)" appearing in Strange Horizons on February 3. Strange Horizons, y'all!!!! It's going to be awesome. Another short story, "Sun-Touched" will appear in Kaleidotrope sometime next year. This would be my second time published in this magazine, but online this time. There will also be some new poetry from me showing up next year. Details will be forthcoming.

The biggest news I had this year, though, was becoming Associate Editor at Podcastle. I've been listening to Podcastle ever since they debuted in April 2008, but I never thought that one day I'd be slushing stories and narrating for them. And thanks to all the generous donations from the Metacast they did in October, looks like we'll be continuing into 2014. We could still use your support, though, so definitely contribute what you can.

What does 2014 hold? I don't know. What I do know is I want to communicate more. Well, yeah, yeah, there's this whole writing thing. But it's not about that. I want to get in touch with people more. Talk to them more. Have conversations more. Heck, I want to write on this blog more. Make myself a little more vulnerable.

As I'm writing this, Neil Gaiman's latest blog post popped up on my newsfeed about him taking a social media hiatus and doing more writing and blogging. I'm pondering that. It feels that I've grown too dependent on social media. I pass along links and memes I like, but I don't do much speaking.

It feels like I don't have much to say.

I think I'll use 2014 to find my words again.

Musing Izumi

Sometimes I keep forgetting that not everyone has Facebook or Twitter, so I forget to update things here at the Cafe. But I wanted to announce that I am now part of the editorial staff at PodCastle, the fantasy audio magazine that's part of the Escape Artists family of podcasts (which includes EscapePod and PseudoPod, stories for science fiction and horror, respectively). Along with Ann Leckie, I serve as associate editor in reading slush and doing other duties for co-editors Anna Schwind and Dave Thompson (another Viable Paradise alum!).

Part of my new duties is that I get to narrate stories. And you can now hear my very first narration, "Georgina and the Basilisk" written by Leslianne Wilder. She was the third place winner of this past year's flash fiction contest at Podcastle. This along with the other winners, "The Bear" by Taven Moore (2nd place) and "Wuffle" by Chantal Beaulne (1st place), can be heard in Episode 288: Flash Fiction Contest Strikes Back!

Go over and have a listen. If you like what you hear, let PodCastle know in its forum, or donate, or even become a subscriber (to do so, to go PodCastle's page and click on the DONATE or SUBSCRIBE buttons on the right hand side).. It doesn't cost much, and you get some awesome stories, some that might even be picked by yours truly.

I’m honored to be part of an awesome podcast, and I’m looking forward to this new adventure!

Musing Izumi

As most of you know, I do most of my writing using Writer's Cafe. It's a great tool I found at the beginning of my writing career when I was looking for something that matched Scrivener, which was only Mac at the time. You can find my write up of that here.

A couple of years ago, Scrivener finally came out with a Windows version. By then, I had become a die hard fan of Writer's Cafe, so I wasn't looking to switch. But I was still curious, so I downloaded a demo and wrote a short story using it. There were some cool features Scrivener had that WC didn't have, but other features WC ruled on that Scrivener was lacking. I decided I was happy with WC enough that I didn't want to shell out $40 for Scrivener.

Flash forward to this summer. WC hadn't been updated for a while, and I found that I really missed some of Scrivener's features. So when I caught Scrivener on sale at Amazon for half price, I snatched it up. I've been using it since. But which is the better writing program?

So without further ado:


CAGE MATCH -- WRITER'S CAFE VERSUS SCRIVENER. FIGHT!!!!!

(Note—I’m comparing Writer’s Café to the Scrivener for Windows version, which I know is a tooled down version of Scrivener for Mac. Yes, I know the Mac version is better, but seeing that I don’t own a Mac, oh well.)

Similarities: WC & Scrivener are both dedicated to the art of writing. You write a whole book in either of them, write short stories, or do screenwriting. You can import text, edit, and export to an external program. You can keep notes, pictures, websites for research, and both programs come with a "corkboard" where you can view outline of your stories.  And both have really good support, Scrivener with its forums and WC with its Yahoo email group.

Differences: WC has different 'programs' within itself that you can choose to do your work via different tabs and/or a desktop that has icons to different parts of yourself, whereas Scrivener keeps everything on one place. WC is geared from the brainstorming and structuring part of writing, while Scrivener's emphasis is more on the writing itself. I'll get into more detail starting with Scrivener.

Scrivener's plusses: As I mentioned, Scrivener is focused on writing. It makes for a great word processor because it has everything there at your fingertips. Conceivably, you can open up Scrivener without knowing anything about how it works and just start writing, because the space is intuitive. You can also make it so that you can block out everything except your writing space. If you're a writer who works by scenes, Scrivener makes this super easy. You can move scenes around, split documents into separate sections and vice versa. You can also write a story in a single text document without splitting into scenes. There are many shortcuts and functions that mimic Microsoft word, such as comments and footnotes, plus features Word doesn't have, such as the document and project notes, which I use to store text I'm editing out of a story on the chance I might need to use it again.

Another thing I really like about Scrivener is that you can make a "Scrivener Link" to point to any document in the program. So you can make your own wiki in scrivener, make key words point to notes. I really wish this feature was in Writer's Cafe. It would make cross-referencing my research and notes so much easier.

I'm still working with Scrivener and discovering new things to do as I go, but I already feel I got more than my money's worth. Scrivener as a word processor and writing tool outshines Writer's Cafe, which also have a writing processor, but is buried and has bare bone features.

Writer's Cafe plusses: WC may not do so well for writing stories, but when it comes to researching, planning and outlining, it outshines Scrivener.

WC's strength is its Storylines feature, which is similar to the corkboard in Scrivener in that you can have cards that show synopses of your story, tags. However, WC allows you to group cards according to "storyline". You can  hide storylines or create multiples storylines. For instance, I have a storyline showing all the plots in my novel, but I also have another storyline showing a timeline of current events, and I have a storyline showing a timeline of the distant past.

WC's also has Scrapbook, which like Scrivener, holds notes and websites for research. One feature WC has that Scrivener doesn't is the ability to double-click on a URL on a webpage and copy it to Scrapbook (very useful when you're collecting information for research). You can also make a collage...not very user friendly, but good if you want to do a visual character sketch.

There's the pinboard, which gives you a unstructured corkboard to brainstorm lists. And of course, there are the notebook and journal features, which allow you to freewrite to your heart's content. You can use writer's prompts and write using a timer.

If you're a freewriter like me, Writer's Cafe is excellent for brainstorming and planning before you get to the actual writing. WC gives a chance for your brain to play before you get down to the nuts and bolts of writing.


The winner? Scrivener (kind of)

I've used Writer's Cafe long enough that I would go to bat for it in a heartbeat. And I still do. But I have to say, if it boiled down to only one program to buy, Scrivener would be the best program because it's all self-contained. I've completed two short stories in Scrivener, and it was super easy to brainstorm, write, proofread, and export the stories into the right format. Julian, the creator behind Writer's Cafe, had written about upgrading WC to include many features Scrivener has, including a better word processor to make it easier to focus on the writing of stories, but this has yet to happen. And now that Scrivener for Windows is out, I dare say that overall, it functions as a better writing tool than WC. If you don't have a writing program and are looking for one, Scrivener is your best bet.

But I can't completely endorse Scrivener for Windows. I don't know how often Scrivener updates its Window version, but it seems many of the functions that make Scrivener a superior writing program has yet to cross over to the Windows version. And this is where Writer's Cafe picks up most of the slack, because while it's not a good writing tool, it's an excellent brainstorming and planning too.

So...if you can get both, do it. I was able to get Scrivener on sale from Amazon a few months ago, and I found that while I do most of the writing in Scrivener, I still do most of my freewriting, brainstorming and plotting through Writer's cafe. Sort of like a left brain/Scrivener vs right brain/WC sort of thing. Both work well together.

Ironically, I'm not using either program to write this blog post. I'm using Evernote, which is a whole different ball of wax altogether. But that will have to be another cage match.

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